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2022 Regular Legislative Session

June 22, 2022 5:12 AM | Anonymous

6/22/22 Update: 

Vetoes

The 2022 regular legislative session ended on June 6, 2022. In ARTICLE III., Section 18 of the Louisiana Constitution, a bill, except a joint resolution, shall become law if the governor signs it or if he fails to sign or veto it within ten days after delivery to him if the legislature is in session on the tenth day after such delivery, or within twenty days after delivery if the tenth day after delivery occurs after the legislature is adjourned.

To date, Governor John Bel Edwards has vetoed 22 bills and put line items on one other. A few of note that were vetoed include HB 54 by Rep. Larry Bagley (Chair of House Health & Welfare) and SB 141 by Sen. Jay Morris, both of which addressed issues related to vaccination status. Governor Edwards also vetoed HB 194 and SB 203 – bills that proposed education savings accounts for students with disabilities. Lawmakers are waiting on the governor’s final vetoes before they can decide on canceling the prescheduled July override session.

6/1/22 Update:

With less than a week left of the 2022 regular legislative session, there are still several issues brewing.

Budget

Work was wrapped up on the state’s $39 billion May 19th. The bill includes a $1,500 annual raise for teachers, $500 less than Gov. John Bel Edwards was pushing for. It also would direct $300 million toward a proposed new Mississippi River bridge in the Baton Rouge area—less than the $500 million Governor Edwards was wanted but more than legislative leaders originally wanted to commit. Governor Edwards, a Democrat, can veto individual line items within the budget. The early adoption by the Republican-led House and Senate this year means those bodies will likely have an opportunity to override any line-item vetoes.

Guns

A House-passed bill doing away with the need for a permit to carry a concealed weapon awaits action in the Senate—as the national gun debate has been renewed after the Uvalde, Texas, school shooting that killed 19 children. Governor Edwards vetoed similar legislation last year after it passed despite opposition from many in law enforcement. It’s one of several bills filed by gun-control opponents awaiting action in the final days.

Congressional districts

Lawmakers suspended the 2022 regular session to convene a “veto session,” where they overrode Edwards’ veto of a new congressional district map adopted earlier in a February special session. Edwards had objected to the lack of a second majority-Black district. The map is now the subject of court battles.

Recognition of Nonprofits

Speaker Schexnayder’s House Concurrent Resolution No. 115 was signed by the President of the Senate on May 31, 2022. HCR 115 memorializes the United States Congress to support the partnership between nonprofit organizations and the federal government.

HOUSE BILL FILING COUNTS:
BILL FILING COUNTS:
Total HB(s) filed: 1083
Total HCR(s) filed: 132
Total HR(s) filed: 206

SENATE BILL FILING COUNTS:
BILL FILING COUNTS:
Total SB(s) filed: 499
Total SCR(s) filed: 70
Total SR(s) filed: 167

If you plan to head to the Capitol to view the legislative process or testify on a bill, here’s important information in regards to parking, attending committee meetings and registering your support or opposition to specific legislation. Anyone can also view videos from past House and Senate committee hearings.

June 3, 2022 at 6:00 PM is the deadline for 3rd Reading & Final Passage w/o Consent

  • 82nd calendar day or 57th legislative day, whichever is first. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

June 6, 2022 at 6:00 PM - Adjourn sine die; Session ends - adjournment sine die. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

July 20 - Qualifying opens for Congressional primary election

July 22 – Qualifying closes for Congressional primary election

August 1, 2022 - Effective date of acts unless earlier/later specified. Const. Art. III, §19

5/5/22 Update:

Senate President Page Cortez selected Senator Joe Bouie as the new chairman of the Senate Committee on Local and Municipal Affairs. Senator Bouie replaces former Senator Karen Carter Peterson.

All daily House and Senate committee schedules and the list of bills in each committee can be viewed online. All committee hearings are also streamlined live.

House Bill Filing Counts:

Total HB(s) filed: 1073

Total HCR(s) filed: 103

Total HR(s) filed: 110

Senate Bill Filing Counts:

Total SB(s) filed: 496

Total SCR(s) filed: 46

Total SR(s) filed: 105

If you plan to head to the Capitol to view the legislative process or testify on a bill, here’s important information in regards to parking, attending committee meetings and registering your support or opposition to specific legislation. Anyone can also view videos from past House and Senate committee hearings.

June 3, 2022 at 6:00 PM is the deadline for 3rd Reading & Final Passage w/o Consent

- 82nd calendar day or 57th legislative day, whichever is first. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

June 6, 2022 at 6:00 PM - Adjourn sine die; Session ends - adjournment sine die. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

August 1, 2022 - Effective date of acts unless earlier/later specified. Const. Art. III, §19

4/20/22 Update: 

All daily House and Senate committee schedules and the list of bills in each committee can be viewed online. All committee hearings are also streamlined live. 

House Bill Filing Counts:

Total HB(s) filed: 1060

Total HCR(s) filed: 75

Total HR(s) filed: 70

Bill Filing Counts:

Total SB(s) filed: 494

Total SCR(s) filed: 32

Total SR(s) filed: 64

If you plan to head to the Capitol to view the legislative process or testify on a bill, here’s important information in regards to parking, attending committee meetings and registering your support or opposition to specific legislation. Anyone can also view videos from past House and Senate committee hearings.

June 3, 2022 at 6:00 PM is the deadline for 3rd Reading & Final Passage w/o Consent

- 82nd calendar day or 57th legislative day, whichever is first. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

June 6, 2022 at 6:00 PM - Adjourn sine die; Session ends - adjournment sine die. Const. Art. III, §2(A)(3)(a)

August 1, 2022 - Effective date of acts unless earlier/later specified. Const. Art. III, §19

4/13/22 Update: 

Louisiana lawmakers are one-third of the way through the regular legislative session, but there’s more bills to consider. April 6th was the deadline for lawmakers to file an additional five bills, and one of those bills is for the administration’s package of bills.  HB 976 from Rep. Ed Larvadain targets bad faith insurance penalties. All daily House and Senate committee schedules and the list of bills in each committee can be viewed online. All committee hearings are also streamlined live.

House Bill Filing Counts:

  • Total HB(s) filed: 1059
  • Total HCR(s) filed: 66
  • Total HR(s) filed: 58

Senate Bill Filing Counts:

  • Total SB(s) filed: 494
  • Total SCR(s) filed: 27
  • Total SR(s) filed: 46

3/23/22 Update: 

Louisiana will take a second stab at creating a centralized sales tax collection system with lawmakers seeking a referendum vote in November. H.B. 681, (House Speaker Clay Schexnayder) which is a Constitutional Amendment that attempts to streamline Louisiana’s sales and use tax administration system voluntarily deferred until next week. It would amend a feature of the state constitution dealing with the authorities of local taxing jurisdictions. If passed, it would modernize Louisiana’s fragmented sales tax system and create a centrally administered Streamlined Sales and Use Tax Commission. The legislation is virtually identical to a bill enacted last year that ended with 52% of voters opposing centralized sales tax collection. 

The chairman of the Senate Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Committee, Senator Bret Allain, has filed a backup bill just in case the lead constitutional amendment doesn’t make it through the process. "I won’t need the bill if the centralization amendment passes again," said Chairman Bret Allain.

Background on Louisiana’s Tax Reform Efforts (Source: Advantous Consulting)

The Louisiana Constitution prohibits legislation during non-fiscal sessions that levies a new tax, increases an existing tax, or legislates with regard to tax exemptions, exclusions, deductions, or credits. Fiscal sessions occur in odd numbered years (i.e. 2021) and non-fiscal sessions occur in even numbered years (i.e. 2022). While legislators are limited by these constitutional restraints, tax reform is not completely off the table. Tax legislation that is administrative or regulatory in nature can still be introduced and passed into law if the legislation adheres to the provisions provided by the Louisiana Constitution. Additionally, tax reductions are germane to a non-fiscal session.

During Louisiana’s 2021 Regular Legislative Session, which was a fiscal session, legislators set out to accomplish seven key tax reform items: streamlining the state’s sales tax collection system, eliminating the federal income tax deduction for corporate and individual income taxes, lowering the income tax rates, continuing to phase out the franchise tax, phasing out the inventory tax, centralizing the process to participate in the Industrial Tax Exemption Program (ITEP), and reforming the state’s severance tax. Of these seven items, Louisiana saw the passage of three key items through the legislative process: the elimination of the federal income tax deduction for corporate and individual income taxes, the lowering of income tax rates, and the phasing out of the franchise tax.


3/9/22 Update: 

Louisiana politicos are preparing for the 2022 Regular Legislative Session that begins Monday at noon and must be completed by 6 p.m. Monday June 6. At 1pm on Monday, March 14, Gov. John Bel Edwards will address a joint meeting of the Louisiana House and the state Senate. Committees will meet in the morning next week to start moving over 1,000 pieces of legislation through the process. Representatives filed 807 bills and senators added 390 more. Plus, lawmakers will consider nine resolutions. The final deadline to introduce bills during the regular session is April 5th at 6pm, so there will be many more pieces of legislation as “a member may introduce not more than five additional bills after session begins.” Joint Rule No. 18 provides that the following bills are not subject to this five-bill limit: general appropriation bill, judicial branch appropriation, legislative branch appropriation, capital outlay bill, omnibus bond authorization bill, supplemental appropriations bill, revenue sharing bill, and ancillary funds bill.

Lawmakers can only focus on finances, pass taxes and the such, during odd-numbered years. With the influx of billions of federal dollars into the state– aimed at averting a recession because of COVID-19 pandemic measures—“how to spend the billions of federal one-time money” will be at the top of the ticket amongst the potpourri of bills during this even year legislative session. Legislators and the Edwards’ administration are trying to remain conservative, not grow government with services that need to be paid annually, pay down debt, and push a lot of the excess money into one-time investments.

 
CONTACT US
225.929.5266
info@louisiananonprofits.org
P.O. Box 1924
Baton Rouge, LA 70821

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